Health Care

Politics & Society News
It is obvious that passing legislation on health care is going to be a heavy lift in Congress.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. walks from the Senate Chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 25, 2017, as he steers the Senate toward a crucial vote on the Republican health care bill. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Politics & Society Dispatches
Republican proposals “exclude too many people, including immigrants,” Bishop Frank J. Dewane said in a statement.
A demonstration for affordable health care in New York City on July 13. Bishop Frank J. Dewane of Venice, Fla., chairman of the U.S. bishops' Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, called on the Senate July 21 to fix problems with the Affordable Care Act in a more narrow way, rather than repeal it without an adequate replacement. (CNS photo/Andrew Gombert, EPA)
Politics & Society News
The sisters say that they are “most troubled by the cuts it would make to Medicaid by ending the Medicaid expansion and instituting a per capita cap [on spending].”
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Bishop Frank J. Dewane called both the House and Senate health care bills “seriously flawed.”
Politics & Society News
Catholic health care leaders said they hope Congress will work together, in small steps, to fix flaws in the current legislation.
John Carr, director of the Initiative on Catholic Social Thought and Public Life at Georgetown University, speaks during a 23-hour prayer vigil June 29 on Capitol Hill in Washington. The vigil focused on preserving Medicaid and was organized after the Senate delayed a vote on the Better Care Reconciliation Act, its health care reform bill. (CNS photo/Jaclyn Lippelmann)
Politics & Society News
The Catholic Health Association, meanwhile, said the revisions to the proposal “reinforces the fact that this bill cannot be fixed.”